Greek Mythology

We have finished up our 3-week Greek Mythology Block, and it was a great success. I used D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths for the stories. As usual, the D’Aulaires’ do not disappoint! Their exciting stories and fantastic illustrations are captivating every time.

greece mlb cover
The cover was made at the end of the block, with my daughter finally getting to draw the mighty Zeus!

Spelling words week 1:

burglar
skiing
awkward
protein
counterfeit
ambrosia
sickle
impenetrable
upheaval
iridescent
immortality
gaiety
adequate
admissible
silhouette

 gaea and uranus 5th gradergaea the beginning of the gods 5th grader
5th Grader’s Main Lesson Book pages (from D’Aulaires’)

gaea and uranus - mom
My Gaea and Uranus.

poseidon 5th grader
5th Grader’s Poseidon (from D’Aulaires’).

poseidon mom
My Poseidon pencil drawing.

pandora's jar 5th grader
For the picture of Pandora’s Jar we used chalk pastels. I found this stunning drawing online and just had to do it. The little miseries were mostly from the D’Aulaires’ book. If you have never tried chalk (soft) pastels, I encourage you to try! We used paper that has a pretty good ‘tooth’ to it, as the chalk gets in the grooves nicely. We rub the chalks onto the paper, and then rub chalk dust right into the paper with our fingertips. We keep a piece of newspaper nearby, and tap the excess dust on it. This can be a bit messy! It is best to get a set with quite a few colors, as they can be finicky about blending. We have each have this set:

It is important to apply a fixative to the finished product, or it will rub off.

pandora's jar mom
My chalk (soft) pastel drawing of Pandora’s Jar. Incidentally, I had never in my life read a story that referred to it as a jar. It was always Pandora’s Box. But given the Greek’s love of pottery, the jar seems more fitting. Plus, it is way more fun to draw!

greek alphabet 5th grader
5th Grader’s Greek Alphabet, written with a fountain pen fitted with a calligraphy nib. This was a treat! The only problem was that she wanted to write her name and such all day, instead of the Greek alphabet. But, it was finally completed.

heracles 5th grader
The Twelve Labors of Heracles was a wonderful story… sure to delight any boy. My son absolutely relished this story. This picture came from Live Ed.

isis 5th grader
After we had read most of the stories, I asked my daughter who was her favorite god or goddess, and the next day’s artwork would be that god. She thought it might be Zeus, but no, it turned out to be Iris, the messenger of the gods. Iris is only briefly mentioned a couple of times in the stories, and she does not really have a story of her own. But she does have a rainbow, and my daughter never passes up an opportunity to paint a rainbow!

Spelling List Week 2:

ailment
crystal
crystallize
exhibit
monotonous
somersault
approval
detach
irresistible
pastime
onslaught
terrific
democracy
foreigner
flourished

 

troy painting 5th grader troy painting mom
And lastly, in our spare time, we have been reading The Adventures of Odysseus & The Tale of Troy: Homer’s Great Epics. This story is also briefly told in D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths. So we painted the Trojan Horse, but I am not very excited about this painting. If you decided to paint the Trojan Horse, please let me know, as I would love to know how to make this painting better!

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This entry was posted in Grade 5, Greece, Watercolor Painting. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Greek Mythology

  1. Cathy says:

    What a beautiful painting of Iris! How lovely to have a rainbow bridge to escape all traffic. I want one!

  2. Seeking Joyful Simplicity says:

    Lovely work! Thank you for sharing – such an inspiration.

  3. Rachel says:

    Thank you for sharing your/your children’s work! I love getting inspiration from other Waldorf Homeschoolers.

  4. Evi says:

    What beautiful work!! Thank you for sharing! Your children are very fortunate to have such a clever mama!

  5. Amber Melody says:

    Perfect! We start D’Aulaires next week 🙂
    Your paintings are stunning. x

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